How to Pick the Right Summer Camp for Kids

Every year, in the months preceding summer, parents scramble to ensure that they find the right summer camp for their kids.

The right summer camp is one that your child will enjoy, is convenient for the parent and something that the parent can afford. Finding this mix might be difficult, but it’s definitely not impossible.

Here are some things that should be at the top of your mind when looking for the right summer camp.

1. Consider your child’s interests
Keeping in mind that the right summer camp is one that your child will enjoy, you need to ensure that what you select matches your child’s interests. What activities does your child like or gravitate towards? Your child’s likes, dislikes and limitations should be at the top of your mind when choosing the type of camp your child will attend.

2. Don’t be afraid to try something new
That being said, doing the same thing over and over again is boring. So don’t be afraid to try something new. If your child is in a rut, shake things up a little. Try a new activity or even a new type of camp. Your child will enjoy it and thank you for it.

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3. See what camps other parents recommend
A great way to do research of any kind is the word of mouth approach, so ask around. You should especially ask parents with kids a couple of years older than yours. They’ve had a few more years to research and plan and can give you helpful tips. Find out what camps they recommend and why, as well as their personal experience with the camp. This will help a lot in finding the perfect fit.

4. Be realistic about convenience
You may find a great camp but if it is inconvenient for you, let it go. You should take into consideration your schedule and the location of the camp. If the camp is more than an hour’s drive from your house, that long commute may get old very quickly. Also, if you get out of work late and could never pick up your child on time, you’ll be racking up late fees, not to mention inconveniencing the camp staff.

5. Take your child along when you tour the camp
Would you buy a car without ever laying eyes on it? Then why send your child to camp he/she knows nothing of? Your child will be the one attending the camp, not you, so it’s important to get your child’s feedback. Take your child with you and find out how your child reacts to the facility and people. It will also give you an opportunity to evaluate how the staff interacts with your child.

Choosing a summer camp is very important because the right camp could be the best thing that has happened to your child and the wrong camp could turn the summer into a nightmare. So find the perfect fit for your child and for you.